Home World Newspaper headlines: ‘UK will regret Brexit’ and Prince George school intruder

Newspaper headlines: ‘UK will regret Brexit’ and Prince George school intruder

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Telegraph

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The Telegraph leads on comments made by European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker, who said Britain will “regret Brexit”, and called on Europe to develop stronger economic and political ties. The article calls the speech a “blueprint” for the “United States of Europe”, with closer unions on asylum, defence and foreign policy.

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Express Newspapers

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The Daily Express also highlights Jean-Claude Juncker’s speech on the EU’s future post-Brexit, claiming “Brussels boss reveals plot to grab even more power”. The article highlights a quote from UKIP MEP Nigel Farage after the speech, in which he says “thank God we are leaving” the EU.

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News UK

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New figures show foreign companies selling goods to the UK through Amazon and eBay are evading tax on a third of all sales, according to The Times. The article claims HM Revenue and Customs has accused Amazon of not tackling the multi-billion pound fraud, while profiting from commissions of sales. Parliament’s Public Accounts Committee said the marketplace was being obstructive in providing data, which is costing taxpayers £1.5bn per year.

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Johnston Press

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The i leads on news that MPs passed a Labour motion for a “fair pay rise” for NHS workers, after the DUP signalled it would not side with the government whip. Although the vote is non-binding it will put pressure on the government to consider a pay rise, after reports the cap for police and prison officers would be lifted. The DUP has a pact with the Conservatives to give Theresa May a working majority, so the government can pass major legislation.

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GMG

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The Guardian reports on an independent inquiry into football sexual abuse, which has heard claims that ex-England manager Graham Taylor was warned about the perversions of an Aston Villa scout convicted for offences over a 13-year period.

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Financial Times

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The Bank of England faces a dilemma on whether to raise interest rates as unemployment hits a 42-year low. Low unemployment has not yet resulted in higher wages, according to the Financial Times. The paper claims the unemployment rate falling to 4.3% and inflation climbing to 2.9% suggests higher interest rates are required to “cool the economy and halt inflation’s rise”. But with poor wage growth the UK’s central bank remains hesitant to raise interest rates from its record 0.25% low.

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DMG Media

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The Metro reports on news that security measures at Prince George’s new school have been reviewed after a woman was arrested on suspicion of burglary. Thomas’s Battersea school was broken in to on Tuesday afternoon when lessons were in progress. Kensington Palace said the young prince was in the school at the time.

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News UK

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The Sun also leads on news the Prince George’s school in Battersea was the victim of an intruder, who the paper claims tried to break in twice in a 24-hour period.

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Mirror newspapers

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The Daily Mirror also highlights the news that the Metropolitan Police is investigating reports of an intrusion at Prince George’s school. It also reports that ex-England football manager Graham Taylor has been accused of assisting a cover-up of sexual abuse in the game.

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DMG Media

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The Daily Mail leads on news that UK overseas territories ravaged by Hurricane Irma cannot use a £13bn foreign aid budget because they are “too wealthy”. The paper adds that rules set out by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development dictates that areas like Anguila and British Virgin Islands cannot receive aid, whereas developing economies like China and India can.

“There are jobs galore,” declares The Sun. The paper takes one look at “the best unemployment figures in 42 years” and suggests that we should all be celebrating, even if too many of those jobs are still low paid. Why then, asks The Times, are wages not rising. By all the established principles of economics, the paper says, “wages should be rocketing”.

As one economist tells the Financial Times, more people in work means employers should be finding it harder to recruit, and paying more to attract new staff. A leading article in The Times suggests the explanation is poor productivity. It adds until we do something about that, there’ll be no return to “full-blooded growth” and rising wages.

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The speech on Wednesday by the president of the European Commission, Jean-Claude Juncker, comes in for some sustained ridicule. “Thank god we are quitting,” says the Daily Express. The Mail calls the tone of the speech “half-sneering, half-threatening”.

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Reuters

The Daily Telegraph has a cartoon of Mr Juncker as a high and mighty Caesar laying down “a vision” for the plebs. And the paper argues that it was his ambition for ever-closer union that drove Britain to the exit door. “We may regret the difficulties of extricating ourselves,” it says, but “we will not regret leaving”.

How far anyone should go in criticising political enemies is a question asked as the papers mull over remarks attributed to George Osborne. As The Guardian reports, he’s said to have told staff at the Evening Standard that he won’t rest until Mrs May is chopped up in bags in his freezer.

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Reuters

The paper calls that “gruesome language” which has upset some of his Conservative colleagues. The Daily Mirror, no friend to Mrs May, calls him “frighteningly bitter” and “more unhinged every day.” Perhaps his words have not been taken entirely seriously though, as The Times quotes a Downing Street spokesman saying, “the contents of the former chancellor’s freezer are not a matter for me”.

Prominent coverage is given to the arrest of an intruder at the school attended by Prince George. The Mirror calls it a “security scare” and says a review is having to be conducted, “just days after Prince George started at his new school”. A former royal protection officer in the Mail thinks the breach was “completely unacceptable”. He said: “Suppose it had been a terrorist intent on killing?”

Notorious murder weapons from the past have a certain fascination for some. The Guardian reports that the “infamous ice axe” used by a Stalinist assassin to murder the exiled Russian revolutionary Leon Trotsky in 1940 is to go on public display for the first time. It will be exhibited in the International spy museum in Washington, having previously been seen only at a police news conference in Mexico City six decades ago.

2017-09-14 09:26:33

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